Who knew that a year and a half could fly by so fast! Likely most people that have been through the tumble drier that is writing a PhD dissertation could tell you that time flies when you are writing your dissertation. Nevertheless, I’m back now! In a new state, at a new university, with a (slightly) new focus - the critical zone! What is the critical zone you ask? The tagline from the National Science Foundation sums it up nicely - “Studying the zone where rock meets life”.

I’m working on datasets from the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory , a field site less than 30 short minutes from the Pennsylvania State University’s main campus. At this field site I was involved in collecting a large, complex 3D active- and passive-source dataset this past summer. With the help of 39 hard working volunteers we deployed 4,000+ single-component geophones and struck sledge hammers at 2,000+ unique locations. We also put out 63 3-component Fairfield Geotechnologies nodes for 19 days to record background ambient seismic noise.

Data preparation and analysis is on-going but I can promise that beautiful signal lies within the depths of this dataset. What we have to do now is work on the important aspects of pulling it out. Until next time - which I promise will not be 1.5 years away - good night and good science ;)